Author Archives: Cameron Kinnear

South African Naval Losses in WW2

Casualties compiled by Don Kindell

ABRAHAMS, Henry, Able Seaman, CN/ 719204 (SANF), SANF, 19 November 1944, died

ADAMS, Douglas E H, Act/Able Seaman, RNVR, 66378 (SANF), SS Tunisia, 4 August 1941, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

ADAMS, Thomas A, Able Seaman, 67953 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

ADAMSON, William D, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 69001 (SANF), Repulse, 10 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

AINSLIE, Roy, Petty Officer, 66382 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 September 1940, died

ALLISON, Oswald H, Able Seaman, RNVR, 67349 (SA), Gloucester, 8 July 1940, bombing, killed

ANDERS, John, Steward, 69637 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

ANDERSON, Henry G, Able Seaman, 67501 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

ANDERSON, Richard W N, Able Seaman, 86082 (SANF), Syvern, 21 May 1941, killed

ANDERSON, Robert D, Engine Room Artificer 2c, 71067 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

ANGEL, Walter J H, Able Seaman, 67351 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

ATKIN, William B, Lieutenant SANF, Northern Duke, 26 January 1944, illness, died

AUSTIN-SMITH, John R, Ordinary Seaman, 67336 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

BAGSHAWE-SMITH, Philip R, Ordinary Seaman, 67337 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

BAGSHAWE-SMITH, Sydney Q, Able Seaman, 68454 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK (brothers from East London, Cape Province)

BAKER, Dennis E W, Ordinary Seaman, 68617 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

BARBER, Benjamin W R, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Copra, 25 February 1946, died

BARBER, Edgar F, Able Seaman, 67302 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

BARKER, Ronald E, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

BASTON, Douglas T, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 68600 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BATEMAN, T (initial only), Chief Engine Room Artificer, 71627 (SANF), SANF, 30 June 1943, died

BATES, John S, Stoker 2c, 68924 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BAWDEN, Wilfred R, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 330425 (SANF), Orion, 16 September 1942, DOWS

BECKER, Stanley H, Able Seaman, 67474 (SANF), Carnarvon Castle, 5 January 1942, road accident, killed

BELL, Douglas S, Ty/Act/Leading Stoker, 67243 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BENNETT, John F, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 330351 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

BERMAN, Nicholas, Ordinary Seaman, 616728 V (SANF), SANF, 22 November 1944, died

BESTEL, Emmanuel A N M, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 21 September 1943, Diego Suarez, died

BESTER, A (initial only) T, Leading Stoker, 6640 (SANF), Africana (SANF), 15 April 1940, died

BESWETHERICK, Hedley C, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 86671 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BETTS, Robert, Able Seaman, 68900 (SANF), SANF, 18 November 1943, died

BISSETT, Alexander, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 16 June 1944, died

BLAKE, Robert E, Petty Officer, P 6572 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

BOSHOFF, Christofel J, Able Seaman, 70339 (SANF), Blaauwberg (SANF), 10 August 1943, killed

BOSWELL, Louis F W, Chief Engine Room Artificer, 69756V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 14 November 1944, MPK

BOTES, John S, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 68924 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BOTHA, Herkulas, Cook, 562093 V (SANF), SANF, 8 May 1944, died

BOTHA, J (initial only) F, Able Seaman, 585386 (SANF), SANF, 8 December 1945, died

BOWER, Robert, Stoker 1c, 69935 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

BRAND, Leslie A, Able Seaman, 69828 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

BROCKLEHURST, Peter S, Able Seaman, 70457 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

BROWN, Ian H, Able Seaman, 71719 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

BRUCE, Alexander M, Stoker 2c, 67907 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BRUCE, John, Able Seaman, 67355 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

BRYSON, Neil W, Ordinary Telegraphist, 69147 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BUCHANAN, Alexander, Able Seaman, 67934 (SANF), Birmingham, 20 April 1942, died

BUITENDACH, James M, Stoker 2c, 69223 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BURNIE, Ian A, Able Seaman, 67786 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

BYRNE, Patrick, Lieutenant SANF, Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

 

CALDER, Frank T, Ordinary Seaman, 67971 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

CAMPBELL, Roy M, Able Seaman, 67318 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

CARLELSE, Frederick, Able Seaman, CN/ 72004 (SANF), Soetvlei (SANF), 29 September 1942, died

CARTER, Frederick G, Able Seaman, 67345 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

CASSON, William, Able Seaman, 252935 V (SANF), Tordonn (SANF), 10 May 1941, died

CAULFIELD, Patrick, Steward, 69802 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHANDLER, Charles R D, Cook (S), 69613 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHENOWETH, Richard, Stoker 1c, 67420 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHILTON, Ronald H D, Ordinary Seaman, 67335 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

CHRISTIAN, J (initial only) W, Able Seaman, CN/ 71965 (SANF), SANF, 5 May 1945, died

CLARE, Frederick W, Chief Petty Officer, 69599 V (SANF), SANF, 3 June 1945, died

CLARKE, Reginald E, Ty/Lieutenant Commander SANF, Adamant, 24 July 1945, air crash, MPK

CLAYTON, Frederick H, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 68102 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

COCHRANE, Joseph, Engine Room Artificer 3c, P 68947 (SANF), SS Empress Of Canada, 13 March 1943, ship loss (Pembroke, O/P), MPK

COMMERFORD, Noel P, Able Seaman, RNVR, 66493 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

COMMERFORD, Terence, Ordinary Seaman, 330258 (SANF), Express, 21 June 1942, died

COOK, John A, Stoker 1c, 70256 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

COOK, W (initial only), Leading Stoker, 70527 V (SANF), SANF, 8 August 1945, died

CRAGG, Ronald F, Able Seaman (DEMS), 66488 (SANF), SS Llandilo, 2 November 1942, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

CRAWFORD, Cecil E, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, RNVR, 67922 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

CROSSLEY, Alfred H, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Saunders, 7 March 1943, MPK

 

DANIELS, Adam, Stoker, 72034 (SANF), SANF, 28 January 1944, died

DAVIE, William, Stoker 1c, 70681 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

DE CASTRO, Alfred T, Stoker 1c, 67914 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

DE KLERK, John, Ordinary Seaman, 585868 V (SANF), SANF, 4 May 1944, died

DE KOCK, Victor P De C, Ty/Lieutenant SANF, Saunders, 7 March 1943, MPK

DELL, Rodney, Able Seaman, 68866 (SANF), Adriat (SANF), 24 March 1943, killed

DICKSON, M (initial only) A, Sub Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 17 October 1946, died

DIXON, Robert, Able Seaman, CN/ 584276 (SANF), SANF, 11 January 1945, died

DIXON, Serfas, Able Seaman, 67743 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

DORE, Frank B, Act/Able Seaman, RNVR, 67218 (SANF), ST La Carriere, 25 February 1942, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

DRUMMOND, Valentine W, Able Seaman, 68043 (SANF), Edinburgh, 30 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

DRURY, Frederick, Ordinary Seaman, 68315 (SANF), Sotra, 29 January 1942, ship loss, MPK

DU PREEZ, Charles P H, Able Seaman, 68175 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

DUTTON, Charles C, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 68949 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

EDWARDS, Ronald E, Ordinary Seaman, 67384 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

ELLIOT, Edward R, Leading Seaman, 66584 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

ENGELBEEN, Leslie C, Able Seaman, 562235 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

EVENPOEL, Albert, Stoker 2c, 67909 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

FAIRLEY, Alexander E, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

FEW, Jim, Able Seaman, 67744 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

FLANAGAN, Terrence D, Able Seaman, 587088 (SANF), SANF, 5 May 1946, died

FLINT, John M, Act/Able Seaman (DEMS), P 562749 (SANF), SS Empire Lake, 15 July 1943, ship loss (President III, O/P), MPK

FLORENCE, John, Stoker, CN/ 71982 V (SANF), SANF, 18 January 1944, died

FRIEDLANDER, Cecil A, Able Seaman, 114703 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

FROST, M (initial only) L, Able Seaman, CN/ 71804 (SANF), Receiffe (SANF), 17 August 1942, died

FULLFORD, Watton, Chief Petty Officer, 69711 (SANF), SANF, 8 June 1946, died

 

GARDINER, Elliott, Able Seaman, 67260 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

GEFFEN, Sender, Stoker 1c, 68035 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

GERAGHTY, Herbert C, Able Seaman, 67338 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

GILBRIDE, Charles S, Lieutenant (Sp) SANF, Goede Hoop (SANF), 29 December 1946, died

GITTINS, Victor L, Ordinary Seaman, 69325 (SANF), Assegai, 27 January 1943, died

GLENN, Paul V, Ordinary Seaman, 68906 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, DOW

GREENACRE, John H, Leading Seaman, 69677 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

GROGAN, Graham B, Able Seaman, 67343 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

HAINES, Eric G, Able Seaman, 67697 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HALLIFAX, Guy W, Rear Admiral SANF, Director of SA Forces, 28 March 1941, accident, killed

HANSLO, Raymond F, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68295 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

HARLE, Paul A, Petty Officer, 71796 (SANF), SANF, 3 October 1943, died

HARRIS, R (initial only) H, Telegraphist, 330488 (SANF), SANF, 16 December 1943, died

HAWKINS, Reginald D, Able Seaman, 66700 (SANF), Cornwall, 4 March 1942, illness, died

HAYES, Richard T, Ordinary Seaman, 68499 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

HEARD, George A, Lieutenant SANF, Goede Hoop (SANF), 8 August 1945, died

HEASMAN, Gratwicke E E, Engine Room Artificer 4c, 69784 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

HENDERSON, Alexander P, Chief Engine Room Artificer, 562099 (SANF), SANF, 1 April 1943, Benghazi Libya, killed

HOGG, Roy S, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

HOLT, Albert E, Telegraphist, 69576 (SANF), Southern Maid (SANF), 3 June 1941, killed

HOOK, Aubrey C, Able Seaman, 67862 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HORNE, P (initial only) D, Chief Petty Officer, 66661 V (SANF), SANF, 31 March 1945, died

HOWARD, Harold D, Signalman, 67289 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HOWDEN, Russell K, Ty/Sub Lieutenant SANF, ML 1163, 4 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

HOWE, Horace G, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68680 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

HUBBARD, Wallace S, Able Seaman, 67960 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

HUGHES, T (initial only) J, Stoker, 71383 (SANF), SANF, 10 May 1941, died

 

INNES, Ian Mck, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

ISAACS, N (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/ 584368 V (SANF), SANF, 14 May 1946, died

 

JACOBZ, Frank H, Stoker 1c, 70374 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

JAGGER, Leslie J, Lieutenant SANF, 70016 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

JAMES, H (initial only), Steward, CN/ 72252 (SANF), Gonding (SANF), 9 May 1943, died

JAMES, Victor F, Ordinary Seaman, 67303 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

JANSEN, S (initial only) C, Able Seaman, CN/ 584477 V (SANF), SANF, 4 October 1945, died

JENKINS, Edward G, Engine Room Artificer, 66720 V (SANF), SANF, 14 September 1944, died

JENSEN, Niels P, Able Seaman, 67347 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

JOHNSTONE, Henry N, Lieutenant Commander (E) SANF, 66727, Birmingham, 18 August 1942, died

JUBY, Kenneth J, Ordinary Seaman, 69211 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

KEENEY, Frederick W, Able Seaman, 67748 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KEET, H (initial only) M T, Able Seaman, 586028 (SANF), SANF, 4 May 1946, died

KEITH, Kenneth I B, Able Seaman, RNVR, 66742 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KEMACK, Brian N, Signalman, 67883 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

KEMERY, S (initial only) P, Leading Writer, 67275 (SANF), SANF, 20 February 1946, died

KEMP, Thomas, Able Seaman, CN/ 71015 V (SANF), SANF, 20 September 1944, died

KENDRICK, George, Stoker 2c, 67910 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KENYON, Graeme A B, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68002 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KEOWN, R (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 71845 (SANF), SANF, 9 June 1945, died

KERSTOFFEL, H (initial only), Stoker, 72310 (SANF), SANF, 14 September 1945, died

KEYTEL, Roy, Able Seaman, 67296 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KIMBLE, Dennis C, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 67600 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KIRSTEN, Monty G W, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68917 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

KONIG, E (initial only), Stoker, 584989 V (SANF), SANF, 27 June 1947, died

KRAUSE, Frederick E, Able Seaman, 68321 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

LA CHARD, Edwin, Lieutenant Commander SANF, SANF, 20 May 1943, died

LA GRANGE, Antony M, Sub Lieutenant (A) SANF, 1772 Sqn Indefatigable, 28 July 1945, air operations, MPK

LAMONT, J (initial only), Steward, 71402 (SANF), SANF, 24 February 1945, died

LAW, Edward, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, RNVR, 66760 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

LEACH, Peter A D H, Stoker 2c, 69225 (SANF), Hollyhock, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

LENZ, William, Able Seaman, 69544 (SANF), SANF, 29 August 1943, died

LIDDLE, John, Lieutenant SANF, Barbrake, 8 August 1945, MPK

LLOYD, George H, Act/Engine Room Artificer 4c, 330353 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

LOUW, Joseph, Stoker, CN 72175 (SANF), Stork, 2 December 1943, illness, died

LUCAS, A (initial only) W, Able Seaman, 152875 (SANF), SANF, 28 May 1943, died

LUCAS, E (initial only) W R, Chief Engineman, 66756 (SANF), SANF, 4 October 1939, died

 

MACWHIRTER, Cecil J, Ty/Sub Lieutenant (A) SANF, 851 Sqn Shah, 14 April 1944, air crash, MPK

MARSH, Reginald H Y, Able Seaman, 69911 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

MATTHEWS, George A, Stoker 1c, 70728 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCCARTHY, Henry F, Ordinary Seaman, 67223 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

MCDAVID, William K, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 69138 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MCEWAN, William A, Steward, 69686 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

MCINTYRE, Norman G, Able Seaman, 67446 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MCINTYRE, William G, Cook (S), 585360 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCLARTY, William D, Leading Stoker, 562246 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCLEAN, Godfrey, Able Seaman, 562455 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

MCLEAN, Richard, Stoker, 562567 (SANF), Smalvlei (SANF), 29 November 1943, died

MCLELLAN, Robert, Ordinary Telegraphist, 67897 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MERRYWEATHER, John, Able Seaman, 67952 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

MEYRICK, Walter, Ordinary Signalman, 68155 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

MITCHELL, William A, Stoker 1c, RNVR, 68796 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MITCHELL, William N, Able Seaman, 69787 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

MOORE, Albert, Able Seaman, 67416 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

MORRIS, Cyril D, Ordinary Seaman, 68932 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

MORRIS, Rodney, Ordinary Signalman, 68596 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

MORROW, Douglas E, Able Seaman, 67989 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

MOSCOS, John G, Leading Writer, 66786 (SANF), SS Ceramic, 7 December 1942, ship loss (SANF, O/P), MPK

MURPHY, J (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/ 72256 (SANF), SANF, 16 August 1942, died

 

NEL, Eloff R, Able Seaman, 69635 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

NICHOLLS, John, Yeoman of Signals, 66824 V (SANF), SANF, 19 December 1943, died

NICHOLSON, Douglas O, Able Seaman, 66833 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

NICOLSON, Andrew, Cook, 63827 (SANF), Disa (SANF), 13 October 1939, died

NIGHTSCALES, Norman, Writer, 68148 (SANF), Fidelity, 30 December 1942, ship loss, MPK

NILAND, St John E, Able Seaman, 209905 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

NORTMAN, Willem, Stoker, 590608 V (SANF), SANF, 28 June 1946, died

NOWLAN, Francis C, Able Seaman, RNVR, 67409 (SANF), Gloucester, 8 July 1940, bombing, DOW

 

OLLERHEAD, Owen, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 14 November 1946, died

ORGILL, C (initial only) B, Able Seaman, CN/ 71947 (SANF), SANF, 14 May 1943, died

ORTON, Charles P, Able Seaman, 68009 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

PAGE, Robert, Sub Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 29 November 1943, died

PALMER, Walter A, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68344 (SANF), Cornwall, 6 April 1942, ship loss (rescued aboard HMS Enterprise), DOW

PEERS, Charles V, Able Seaman, 562653 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

PERRY, Desmond A, Petty Officer, 71211 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

PETERS, Norman, Leading Stoker, 66847 (SANF), SANF, 3 January 1943, died

PETERSON, W (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 72184 (SANF), SANF, 4 September 1942, died

PFAFF, C (initial only) E, Petty Officer Stoker, 562721 V (SANF), SANF, 20 April 1945, died

PITTS, S (initial only) L, Able Seaman, CN/ 564203 (SANF), SANF, 8 November 1945, died

PLATT, Ronald M, Petty Officer, 67160 V (SANF), President III, 26 February 1943, accident, killed

POGGENPOEL, D (initial only) B, Able Seaman, CN/ 71950 V (SANF), SANF, 7 June 1947, died

POVEY, Leonard, Able Seaman, 71182 V (SANF), SANF, 31 March 1945, died

PRICE, David, Able Seaman, RNVR, P/68529 (SANF), Niger, 6 July 1942, ship loss, MPK

PUGH, John R, Able Seaman, 66877 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

RANKIN, Cecil R, Signalman, 67879 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

RAPHAEL, Philip R, Able Seaman, 67841 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

RASMUSSEN, Victor J S, Leading Telegraphist, 66920 (SANF), Dunedin, 24 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

RAVENS, Albert, Able Seaman, CN/ 72213 V (SANF), SANF, 31 March 1944, died

REDMAN, Roland A, Leading Stoker, 67406 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

REHR, Cecil, Able Seaman, 69877 (SANF), Roodepoort (SANF), 25 September 1942, died

REID, Kenneth H, Signalman, 562143 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

RICHARDSON, Ronald P, Able Seaman, 67494 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

ROBBERTS, Kaspar, Petty Officer, P/ 5285 (SANF), SANF, 1 July 1943, died

ROSS, Robert, Stoker 2c, 69119 (SANF), SS Laconia, 1 October 1942, ship loss (Victory, O/P), DOWS

RUITERS, Walter, Stoker, CN/ 72081 (SANF), SANF, 21 July 1942, died

RYALL, David R, Able Seaman, 69999 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

SALCOMBE, Francis R, Stoker 1c, 58589 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

SCHILDER, R (initial only) D, Leading Seaman, CN 71826 V (SANF), SANF, 2 December 1945, died

SCOTT, Clifford, Ordinary Telegraphist, 66973 (SANF), Jaguar, 26 March 1942, ship loss, MPK

SCOTT, William J, Able Seaman, 68007 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SEVEL, Harry, Stoker 1c, 68100 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SHIELDS, Eric E M, Lieutenant SANF, Pembroke IV, 12 April 1944, died

SHIMMIN, William, Leading Stoker, 69661 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

SIENI, Joseph F, Able Seaman, 69788 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

SIMON, Frederick, Stoker, CN/ 72046 V (SANF), SANF, 8 May 1945, died

SLATER, Bryan M, Able Seaman, 67358 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SMITH, Ian R, Electrical Artificer 4c, 68478 (SANF), Hecla, 12 November 1942, ship loss, MPK

SMITH, Matthew S, Able Seaman, 67359 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SMITH, P (initial only), Able Seaman, CN/ 72263 (SANF), SANF, 7 April 1942, died

SNELL, Harold W, Leading Telegraphist, 69827 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

SONDERUP, Arthur W, Able Seaman, 67356 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SPENCE, Noel W, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68732 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SQUIRES, John E, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68728 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

ST CLAIR-WHICKER, Willie H, Able Seaman, 67292 (SANF), SANF, 21 September 1941, died

STADLANDER, Rowland C, Stoker 1c, 67400 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

STANLEY, Gordon J, Able Seaman, 66963 (SANF), Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

STAPELBERG, Willem J, Steward, 562221 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

STEELE, Ewen, Able Seaman, 71272 V (SANF), Southern Sea (SANF), 5 October 1943, killed

STEPHEN, Eric B, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68861 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

STOKOE, Cyril A M, Act/Leading Seaman, 67264 V (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

SUTTON, Donald A, Able Seaman, 70426 (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

SUTTON, George A M, Leading Seaman, 586403 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

SWANEPOEL, S (initial only), Cook, 7112 (SANF), SANF, 21 July 1946, died

SWANN, Lawrence T, Stoker 1c, RNVR, 68710 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

SYMONS, Maurice M, Able Seaman, 68245 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

THOMPSON, Walter E H, Able Seaman, 67360 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

THOMPSON, J (initial only) R, Stoker, 330669 (SANF), SANF, 18 August 1947, died

THORP, Edward C, Signalman, 67852 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

THORPE, Francis D, Able Seaman, 67462 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

THORPE, Maurice, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 69140 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

TITUS, J (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 584418 V (SANF), SANF, 9 April 1947, died

TOMS, Ivanhoe S, Able Seaman, 67709 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

TRAFFORD, William O, Able Seaman, 71222 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

TREAMER, Arthur P, Petty Officer, 71109 (SANF), Parktown (SANF), 21 June 1942, ship loss, MPK

TREISMAN, Gerald, Steward, 584730 V (SANF), SANF, 10 February 1945, died

TROUT, A (initial only) N, Able Seaman, CN/ 72133 (SANF), Stork, 4 August 1942, died

TURNER, N (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 562915 (SANF), SANF, 11 December 1945, died

 

UNSWORTH, Owen P (also known as R K Jevon), Ordinary Seaman, 69089 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

 

VAN AARDT, S (initial only), Stoker, CN/ 721490 (SANF), SANF, 22 May 1945, died

VAN DORDRECHT, William H, Able Seaman, 67851 (SANF), Edinburgh, 30 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VAN DYK, Cecil H, Able Seaman, 67404 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

VAN GRAAN, A (initial only), Able Seaman, CNN/ 957 (SANF), SANF, 10 July 1946, died

VAN NOIE, Norman, Able Seaman, CN/ 72134 (SANF), SANF, 20 September 1941, died

VAN WYNGAARDT, F (initial only) A, Able Seaman, 585610 V (SANF), SANF, 21 July 1945, died

VERSFELD, Peter H S, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68859 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VICKERS, Colin P, Able Seaman, 68296 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VILJOEN, Dennis A, Telegraphist, 70984 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

VINK, Benjamin F, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68860 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

VORSTER, Jack P, Able Seaman, 67755 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

 

WAKE, Vivian H, Ty/Lieutenant (A) SANF, 815 Sqn Landrail, 28 March 1945, air crash, MPK

WALTON, Dudley N, Sub Lieutenant SANF, Southern Floe (SANF), 11 February 1941, ship loss, MPK

WATSON, George, Lieutenant SANF, SANF, 15 October 1944, died

WEBBER, Reginald, Able Seaman, 67361 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

WELCOME, J (initial only) J, Able Seaman, CN/ 72270 (SANF), SANF, 19 July 1945, died

WESTON, Grant E, Ordinary Seaman, RNVR, 68498 (SANF), Phoebe, 27 August 1941, torpedoed, killed

WHITE, Charles W, Petty Officer, 562200 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

WHITE, Edward G, Stoker, 68026 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WHYMARK, Vivian G, Ordinary Seaman, 69024 (SANF), Barham, 25 November 1941, ship loss, MPK

WIBLIN, Eric R, Able Seaman, 67717 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WILD, Ernest A, Able Seaman, 67929 (SANF), Neptune, 19 December 1941, ship loss, MPK

WILLETT, Amos A S, Stoker 1c, 67240 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WILLIAMS, Dastrey S, Leading Seaman, 67047 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

WILLIAMSON, Walter N, Able Seaman, 67803 (SANF), Dorsetshire, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WILLSON, Gerald F, Stoker 2c, RNVR, 69006 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WRIGHT, Gerald V, Act/Ordnance Artificer 4, 67375 (SANF), Gloucester, 22 May 1941, ship loss, MPK

WRIGHT, Thomas H, Able Seaman, RNVR, 68039 (SANF), Cornwall, 5 April 1942, ship loss, MPK

WULFF, Emil F, Leading Seaman, 562466 V (SANF), Treern (SANF), 12 January 1945, ship loss, MPK

 

YATES, Philip R, Supply Assistant, 67570 (SANF), Hermes, 9 April 1942, ship loss, MPK


South African Air Force AH-2 Rooivalk

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Category : Articles

 

South African Air Force AH-2 Rooivalk

The Denel Rooivalk (previously designated AH-2 and CSH-2) is an attack helicopter manufactured by Denel of South Africa. Rooivalk is Afrikaans for “Red Kestrel”.

The South African Air Force (SAAF) ordered 12 Rooivalks, designated the Rooivalk Mk 1 in SAAF service, the first of was officially handed over in April 2011. The helicopters are flown by 16 Squadron, which is based at AFB Bloemspruit near Bloemfontein.

Image and caption courtesy of British and Commonwealth Forces Facebook Page.


Brigadier Dudley Wrangel Clarke CB, CBE – Founder of modern special forces

Category : Articles , South Africa

 

Did you know that a South African was instrumental in founding modern Special Forces as we know them today (The British Commandos, the SAS and even the US Rangers) and defined the art of Deception Warfare?

Brigadier Dudley Wrangel Clarke CB, CBE (27 April 1899 – 7 May 1974), known as a pioneer of military deception operations during the Second World War. His ideas for combining fictional orders of battle, visual deception and double agents helped define Allied deception strategy during the war, for which he has been referred to as “the greatest British deceiver of WW2”.

Clarke was also instrumental in the founding of three famous military units, namely the British Commandos, the Special Air Service and the US Rangers.

Born in Johannesburg and brought up near London, Clarke joined the Royal Artillery as an officer in 1916, but transferred to the Royal Flying Corps after finding he was too young to fight in France. He spent the First World War learning to fly, first in Reading and then Egypt. Clarke returned to the Royal Artillery in 1919 and had a varied career doing intelligence work in the Middle East. In 1936 he was posted to Palestine, where he helped organise the British response to the 1936 Arab uprising.

During the Second World War, Clarke joined John Dill’s staff and proposed, and helped implement, an idea for commando raids into France – an early form of the British Commandos.

In 1940, Archibald Wavell called Clarke to Cairo and placed him in charge of strategic deception. As cover he was employed to set up a regional organisation for MI9, a British escape and evasion department.

The following year Clarke received a war establishment and set up Advanced Headquarters ‘A’ Force with a small staff to plan deception operations. Once satisfied with the department’s structure, he pursued intelligence contacts in Turkey and Spain. In late 1941 Clarke was called to London, where his deception work had come to the attention of Allied high command.

During Clarke’s absence, deception hierarchy in Middle East Command had become muddled. Colonel Ralph Bagnold had taken over deception planning, pushing ‘A’ Force aside. Clarke was sent to El Alamein, where Allied forces were on the retreat, to work on deception plans. Upon his return, Bagnold was sidelined and ‘A’ Force reinstated as the primary deception department. Throughout 1942 Clarke implemented Operation Cascade, an order of battle deception which added many fictional units to the Allied formations. Cascade was a success; by the end of the war the enemy accepted most of the formations as real. From 1942 to 1945, Clarke continued to organise deception in North Africa and southern Europe. After the war he was asked to record the history of ‘A’ Force.

He retired in 1947 and lived the rest of his life in relative obscurity. As well as pursuing a literary career that produced two histories and a thriller, he worked for the Conservative Party and was a director of Securicor. He died in London in 1974.

Reference Wikipedia, Portrait of Brig. Clarke CB CBE


Ian Yule

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Category : News

 

Some news from the South African Legion’s branch in the United Kingdom on Ian Yule (the chap seen here playing the tough cockney Sergeant Tosh Donaldson in “The Wild Geese”). Social services in the UK have finally taken him in, he is now in full time care in permanent accommodation. He now also has the support of military charities in the United Kingdom.

Many of us may remember Ian Yule. He acted in many movies , The Wild Geese being the one he is most remembered for, as well as Zulu Dawn and Shamwari. He starred in numerous SABC series in the 80’s as well. On The Wild Geese he also doubled up as an on set expert weapons advisor and on set military tactics advisor.

Ian Yule arrived from South Africa as a destitute veteran to the United Kingdom in mid December last year and called for assistance – the Rhodesian veteran community responded arranging for him to immediately be taken him into temporary care.

The case was brought to the attention of the South African Legion in the United Kingdom and the SSAFA. The SA Legion in turn engaged the Royal British Legion to ensure full case worker support was given to him – and that priority accommodation and care be made available. SSAFA case workers took control as did pressure on the local council to stop pushing the issue around – and engage a veteran in need (access to these types of “full” benefits in the UK are very difficult if you have not been resident in the country for some time of which Mr Yule was not).

Mr Yule is a British citizen and was born an orphan before World War 2. He was adopted by a couple who were killed in the London Blitz during WW2, he was then taken in by Americans stationed in the UK. He joined the military as a boy soldier and remained in the military for a significant part of his life – the military has been the only family he knew.

His complete service is rather varied, he is British Armed Forces veteran, who subsequently joined the Rhodesian Armed Forces, became a mercenary in the Congo and then he joined the South African Defence Force.

He joined the British Armed Forces about 1948 – Boys Service, and was mustered as a trumpeter for the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery at St. John’s Wood Barracks. He then posted to the School of Artillery at Larkhill.

According to Ian, he became jump qualified at the Jump School at Netheravon. Subsequently he was sent for Infantry Heavy Weapons training and was stationed at Hythe – Kent.

He maintains he received further training at 42 Royal Marine Commando (Kayak and off/onshore submarine loading), and was posted to Malaya, then was seconded to 41 Royal Marine Commando, which was based at American airbase – Toyoko.

Ian’s story picks up again when he was then posted to Korea and took part in the Inchon attack during the Koeran War, on the West coast of Korea. From there he was redeployed and fought at the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir with the American Marines. This is where Ian Yule was captured and taken prisoner, he was a POW of the North Koreans for two and half years.

Upon cessation of the UN War in Korea, he was released, he was redeployed to Egypt, then the Yemen, subsequently redeployed back to Egypt for the Suez Crisis.

This soldier has seen action. He subsequently joined “Mad” Mike Hoare’s 5th Commando in the Congo as a mercenary. He also joined the Rhodesian Armed Forces and after that the SADF.

Ian is now incapacitated, with numerous ‘war wounds’, very bad rheumatoid arthritis, walks with sticks, (but we now have him in a wheel chair), is very hard of hearing (cannot operate a telephone) and has degenerative eyesight. He is also thought to be suffering from on-set dementia. He carries a very bad gun shot wound to the abdomen.

He had moved in a small apartment in Hillbrow and fell into financial despair. Whilst in Hillbrow he was been threatened with his life with little means for proper medical care. Ian Yule arrived in the UK carrying a small carry-on bag with one set of PJ’s and walking sticks – nothing else, apparantly he sold his medals for the one way flight ticket.

Jennie Upton from the RAR veterans association picked him up from the airport and he was in a state of incapacity – the Heathrow staff – upon his arrival had parked him in the luggage collection area, and forgot about him for an hour and half. A kind hearted taxi driver who waited for him whilst Jennie endeavoured to find him reduced his fare from £150 to £100 – even then a big hit for Jennie.

In due course, after he’d had tea, he was driven across Graham and Debbie Goodwin, two “good Samaritans” – who opened their small home in West Sussex to a complete stranger and where he stayed for about 6 weeks. Mr Yule had a severe culture shock, he became disorientated and stressed. The Goodwin’s got him registered at the local Health Centre. Ian then had heart problems and was hospitalised.

Both Peter Dickens from the South African Legion and Jennie Upton from the RAR Rhodesian veterans association worked to get him into proper care at the same time as advising the Goodwins on courses of action to take as this or that door closed to them.

At the end of the day it was a job well done and he is now – against all the odds and with a steep up hill fight – finally in full time and permanent care.

Well done especially to the Graham Goodwin and Jennie Upton, Bravo Zulu to both of you.


South African Seaward Defence Force Anti-submarine Flotilla, WW2

We remember the flotilla of South African whalers converted for military service during World War 2, and the loss of the men aboard the HMSAS Southern Floe.

A number of whalers were converted to anti submarine roles and commissioned into the South African Navy for service, they were part of the South African Seaward Defence Force anti-submarine flotilla.

Some of them were sent to the Mediterranean and based at Alexandria, Egypt – the HMSAS Southern Floe, the HMSAS Southern Sea and their sister ship the HMSAS Southern Maid – which is seen in this rare photograph in Alexandria Harbour (In the foreground is the South African Navy’s HMSAS Protea, a Flower-class corvette).

In 1941 – the HMSAS Southern Floe (Lt J E Lewis) and HMSAS Southern Sea arrived at Tobruk on 31 January 1941 to take over patrol duties from two of their two sister ships.

Although submarines were not a threat in the first six months of the Western Desert campaign, numerous floating mines pointed to the existence of extensive moored mine fields. Except for the sweeping of the narrow coastal traffic route and harbour entrances at this stage there had not yet been time to locate these fields with any accuracy, much less to clear them. The main duty of the two Southerns was alternately to patrol the nearest section of the swept channel and to escort shipping along it. The port at that time was subject to air raids, littered with sunken wrecks and possibly active ground-mines. On patrol, the duties were complicated by sandstorms that strong off-shore winds extended for many miles out to sea, resulting in low visibility, heavy cross-seas, and much discomfort to personnel. To these conditions were added the menace of the mine fields on one side and an ill-defined and unlighted coast on the other.

On the morning of 11 February Southern Sea arrived at the patrol rendezvous, two miles east of Tobruk, but found no sign of Southern Floe. This was reported but caused no concern at first; it had blown hard enough all night for the ship to find herself far from her station at dawn. However that evening, a passing destroyer picked up one man clinging to some wreckage – all that remained of Southern Floe and her company.

This sole survivor was Stoker C J Jones, RNVR (SA), lent from HMS Gloucester to fill a vacancy just before Southern Floe sailed from Alexandria. He was almost insensible after 14 hours in the water, but afterwards stated that he had been in the stokehold when, at about 04:00 there had been a heavy explosion and the ship had filled rapidly. In the darkness, he had found his way into the flooded engine-room and struggled out through the skylight as the ship sank. He had seen a few other persons in the water at that time and later had done his best to support a wounded man. In the absence of other evidence there is little doubt that a mine, either floating or moored, was the cause.

The loss of the ship, although but a trivial incident in a world war, came as a sudden and grievous blow to the flotilla and to the SDF. The ships had spent a bare month on the station and at home few were aware that they had arrived and had been in action. The casualties were the first naval losses suffered by the South African Seaward Defence Force and the sense of loss in the service was profound.

A relic of Southern Floe was brought to South Africa long after, in the form of a small brass ship’s badge, found amidst the other debris of battle 70 miles inland from Benghazi. Supposedly it had floated ashore, attached to a wooden fragment of the ship’s bridge, and been carried thence by an Italian souvenir-hunter.

After the war Stoker Jones, the sole survivor placed a memorial notice in the Cape Town newspapers. He continued to do this for many years until he also passed away.

We salute these brave South Africans – here is the honour roll for the HMSAS Southern Floe.

ANDERS, John, Steward, 69637 (SANF), MPK
BOWER, Robert, Stoker 1c, 69935 (SANF), MPK
BRAND, Leslie A, Able Seaman, 69828 (SANF), MPK
CAULFIELD, Patrick, Steward, 69802 (SANF), MPK
CHANDLER, Charles R D, Cook (S), 69613 (SANF), MPK
CHENOWETH, Richard, Stoker 1c, 67420 (SANF), MPK
FAIRLEY, Alexander E, Sub Lieutenant SANF, MPK
FRIEDLANDER, Cecil A, Able Seaman, 114703 (SANF), MPK
GARDINER, Elliott, Able Seaman, 67260 (SANF), MPK
GREENACRE, John H, Leading Seaman, 69677 (SANF), MPK
HEASMAN, Gratwicke E E, Engine Room Artificer 4c, 69784 (SANF), MPK
HOGG, Roy S, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK
INNES, Ian Mck, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK
LEWIS, John Edward Joseph, :Lieutenant, 70019 (SANF), MPK
MARSH, Reginald H Y, Able Seaman, 69911 (SANF), MPK
MITCHELL, William N, Able Seaman, 69787 (SANF), MPK
NEL, Eloff R, Able Seaman, 69635 (SANF), MPK
NICHOLSON, Douglas O, Able Seaman, 66833 (SANF), MPK
PUGH, John R, Able Seaman, 66877 (SANF), MPK
RYALL, David R, Able Seaman, 69999 (SANF), MPK
SHIMMIN, William, Leading Stoker, 69661 (SANF), MPK
SIENI, Joseph F, Able Seaman, 69788 (SANF), MPK
SNELL, Harold W, Leading Telegraphist, 69827 (SANF), MPK
STANLEY, Gordon J, Able Seaman, 66963 (SANF), MPK
WALTON, Dudley N, Sub Lieutenant, SANF, MPK

Many thanks to Glen Knox from the South African Naval Museum for the story content and his tireless work keeping this history alive. Picture sourced and story adapted for the SA Legion by Peter Dickens


Steve Stevens, DFC (SAAF Beaufighter Pilot)

Steveandkay

Steve and Kay Stevens

Steve Stevens, DFC, is frail, bedridden and in pain. However, there is no doubt that this man is a force, a man who has packed more into his 96 years on Earth than most of us, and who is firmly committed to his goals and his religion.

When I call him to arrange the meeting, he answers the phone himself. We juggle dates; he has an appointment for a radio interview, and I am keen to come and see him at 10h45 on the 11th November so we could pay our respects to the Fallen together. Eventually we settle on a plan.

Early Life

Steve Stevens was born on 27th August 1919 in Amesbury, Dorset. His father George was gassed in Salonica during WW1 and was sent to a special medical facility in Aberdeen for mustard gas victims, and he met and married Dora, one of the VAD’s.

Steve’s father was not expected to live past 40. However, in typical Stevens fashion George Alexander Stevens took no notice of this pronouncement and his health improved enough for him to take up a new assignment in the Army of Occupation in Germany. The family was billeted in a huge house complete with stables, and young Steve was delighted to be placed in the care of a beautiful young fraulien. Steve adored her, and from her learned to speak German better than he could speak English. Steve’s father had improved in health to the extent that he bought a string of polo ponies and a racehorse called Capitas, which he bought for £9 and rode to victory on local army races.

However, George’s health deteriorated and he was given a year’s sick leave, and the family went to live in Switzerland. There, a 7 year old Steve became proficient in skiing, jumping and skating.
With an improvement in health, the family moved to San Remo in Italy, but Steve’s father was soon recalled to his regiment, and made his way to Ireland and The Troubles. Within a year or so the West Yorkshire Regiment was required in India, but medical advice was that Stevens Senior would not survive the climate, and it was recommended that he was invalided out of the army and moved to somewhere warm and dry.

So it was that the family left for a life on a farm in South Africa in November 1929. George’s health improved, but Steve’s mother Dora suddenly fell ill and died of a brain tumour when Steve was only 14.

When WW2 broke out Steve was at the Bible Institute of South Africa. With the decision to close the college for the duration, some of the students joined the Ministry, and Steve joined the SA Air Force. Steve is convinced that the prayers offered three times a day by his father and stepmother kept him safe during the war. Steve joined the SAAF as a trainee air photographer, but soon re-mustered as aircrew.

The Visit

I arrive at the house, and using the information I have been provided, I left myself in. Steve is on his own in the house, and I make my way to his bedroom.

The blue eyes quickly examine me, and I feel thoroughly vetted and I note a long look at my SA Legion tie and blazer badge. We exchange greetings, and we discuss his interest in photography. Then we pause at 11h00 to commemorate the Fallen.

After some reflection Steve informs me that the radio team that came to interview him was despatched through the house to inventory some books he wanted to donate. They had, under his steely gaze, created a list for my perusal so I could choose which books I wanted to pass on to the SAAF Museum and the SA Legion. However, he then decided that we should take all of the books, and I politely declined as I already had a good number. I was informed that on my next visit more books would be provided.

World War Two

attack

This photograph is widely recognised as the most famous Beaufighter air- strike photo of WWII. It shows my plane attacking the Nazi-held medieval walled town of Zuzenberk. That attack by 8 of our 19 South African Air Force Beaufighter squadron resulted in the Yugoslav Partisans recapturing their town that very day. (Steve Stevens)

During the War Steve flew air strikes over Yugoslavia with 19 Squadron, based at Biferno. These strikes included the daring raid on the occupied walled town of Zuzenberk. The image of Steve firing his rockets is one of the two iconic Beaufighter images of the war. It is astonishing to realise that Steve could accurately hit a target as small as a 44 gallon fuel barrel with his rockets.

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Steve photographed Major Tilley attacking the armed German warship SS Kuckuck as Tilley’s number two. It was a desperate sortie which Steve and his fellow pilots fully expected to be a suicide mission. The rockets holed the target under the waterline. The pilots had been briefed by the Partisans that they would face the fire from 140 anti-aircraft guns. Remarkably all four planes returned safely.

60th Anniversary Plaque

Steve and I discuss many topics, and he instructs me to look at a small colourful plaque on a bookshelf. Steve was invited to attend a number of events in Italy, through the efforts of Guiseppe Morini. These events culminated on the 8th May 2005 in Campomarino.

“The ceremonies were in the open air, with a military band, rousing speeches and a fly-past.

Dignitaries from all over Italy were present, while huge flags of all participating countries blew in the wind. The chief of the Italian Air Force, General Leonardo Tricario, was there and a fifty-strong guard of honour marched into the square in our honour. The Italian Air Force also brought in another fifty men – bandsmen who played rousing music.

The warm-hearted Italians responded most generously, and as I put it later to our local newspaper, I’d never been kissed by so many women – and men!”

plaque

When we, Second World War airmen who had flown from Termoli in 1944/5 were presented with these VE Day commemoration plaques, I told them I would value this as much as my DFC because it was a plaque of PEACE. A woman hears the drone of a plane and is in fear of being bombed yet again. But as she looks up she sees it is a PLANE OF PEACE. That’s just what I, and my wife Kay, became involved in Africa with our Mission Aviation Fellowship planes.

Until next time.

All too soon it is time to go when Steve’s team get there to take care of him.

steve-c

I reluctantly leave, but not before I present him with my own beret, which he wears with pride, and when I leave he instructs me to hang the beret on the hat peg next to his SAAF cap.

I leave with a solemn promise we will visit again, and he is looking forward to receiving a membership to the SA Legion UK on our return.

I look forward to meeting him again.

Information with kind permission – Steve Stevens. Article by Cameron Kinnear for the South African Legion – UK & Europe.


Chairman’s Speech, South African Legion – UK and Europe AGM

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Ladies and Gentlemen, for those that were unable to attend the South African Legion – UK and Europe AGM, here is the Chairman’s Speech

Ladies and Gentlemen thank you for assembling for our Annual General Meeting. What a benchmark year 2015 has been. A quick look back through the year is quite telling and the scope of work quite staggering for what is in essence a still a very young branch.

As “Wins” go – there were quite a few:

In February we initiated the very first SS Mendi parade in the Netherlands to remember the victims of the Mendi buried at Noordwijk. This was arranged by our PRO and Chairman in Europe Lgr Andrew Bergman, and a stunning first attempt it was too, soundly supported and executed on an exemplary level.

Andrew is working on the second SS Mendi parade for 2016 and I strongly urge all members to make the effort, take the ferry to join him, it’s an excellent weekend away.

We also led and conducted a parade in Portsmouth with the High Commissioner of the South African embassy, which although been challenged with a weekday and an awkward time, we still managed to put on a good show for Embassy VIP’s, Defence attaches and media.

In March, we were present again at The Commonwealth Day parade at the Memorial Gates, helping our relationship with the Soldiers Charity and the Commonwealth fraternity.

In May, we held the highly successful Standard Dedication ceremony and Italy Commemoration parade at the “Springbok” Cenotaph in Richmond. I cannot even begin to express my extreme thanks and pleasure at what we managed to do for this, by far the biggest event we have managed to put together. This list of participants and thanks far exceeds the time of this address – but suffice it to say “Bravo Zulu” too many Legionnaires would be an understatement. The outcome – a Beautiful and fully dedicated Standard and loads of goodwill from a number of organizations – we had – at last – as they say “come of age”.

Working closer with The Royal British Legion Riders in May, we had a strong presence at their Ace Café commemoration and were central to the attractions on offer – strategically placed next to the SADF Buffel. We helped with their Poppy Appeal raising funds as well as securing prizes for their raffle.

Armed Forces day in June further solidified our friendship with The Royal Naval Association and saw the RBL South African Branch standard on parade on the first time.

This was followed by a highly successful Legion pilgrimage to commemorate the Delville Wood battle in France – getting bigger and better we took a greater command and role in the veteran contingent on parade. We also earned substantial accolade from the dignitaries and organisers for taking care of their VIP invite – Rose McTavish – who’s Grandfather was the Colour Sergeant on the Mendi and is now commemorated at Delville Wood.

In the summer season we took a new twist on the Royal British Legion’s “summer picnics” but doing it South African Style and having a “Braai” instead – rigging up a presence for purposes of recruitment and awareness at The South Africa Day in Basingstoke and the Vetkoek and Vleis Day in Newbury.

Legionnaire’s depth of generosity was on show when Sean Renard secured Peter McAleese’s SADF “slangvel” smock and we as Legion arranged for it to be handed back to him at the book signing and announcement of his second book “beyond no mean soldier’. To see a priceless smock returned to a veteran lit up the room, a true treasure. The motto “Not for Ourselves, but for Others” in true flight.

Lgr Peter Gillatt and I had the privilege of attending the unveiling of the Rhodesian African Rifles memorial at the National Arboretum. Deeply proud of Peter as this event drew the SA Legion very closely to the Rhodesian veterans’ fraternity in the United Kingdom and this relationship is growing closer every day.

In the lead up to this parade, we managed to secure our first Youth organization as a branch thanks to the hard work of Lt Cassandra Shaw, and we are now proudly associated to the 133 Cadet Army Force. This milestone cannot be underestimated as it’s a significant first – both for the Royal British Legion National Branches and the South African Branch.

Another all-time first on the Royal British Legion South African Branch front – the branch was given it’s tickets for The Festival of Remembrance yesterday attended by Tom and Ellen Mason on behalf of the branch – but the true highlight was to see Peter Gillatt carry the Royal British Legion South African branch Standard into the auditorium for the first time – that indeed was historic.

Our relationship with the Royal Hospital continues to get healthier and by their invitation we were able to attend their famous Founders Day parade and The Opening of the Garden of Remembrance earlier this week.

Despite setbacks on the branch’s membership numbers in March, where a small number of our members were inappropriately and actively targeted and eventually wooed to join another veteran organization – the South African branch was quickly able to recover the loss. So much so we are even able to declare a positive membership growth at year end.

This growth and positive striving can easily be seen in today’s parade past the Cenotaph – we had more members on parade this year than we had last year, more participation by members’ families than last year and more enthusiasm, purpose and direction in the branch management.

So how does the way forward in 2016 look?

Happy to report that due to strong measures taken in the first quarter, our social media is now as robust as ever, it’s growing and we now have a very healthy and informative on-line community.

The ever changing beast that is on-line media and how we communicate and keep in touch with one another is quite something to stay on top of. Lgr Cameron Kinnear is working hard behind the scenes to deliver bigger and better things in the new year as the branch keeps apace – look out for a more consolidated Legion digital platform in the works.

As I said last year – our future in the UK does not lie in our ability to draft South Africans veterans off Facebook who have an axe to grind. Our future lies in the way we open ourselves up to the communities in which we operate – it lies in how we make ourselves attractive to those communities and stakeholders.

This is why we are been very successful in bringing members’ families into what we do. The Legion is not a “drinking club” – that image is about as far away from our vision and mission as you can get. We want our wives and children involved; we want youth programs, community programs and family activities.

Last year I spoke of the “nugget” feeling that all of the veterans taking part in the Cenotaph parade would feel, and those here today will know exactly what I mean. When I first came to the UK there no South African representation at the Cenotaph and there was substantial resistance to get us there. We have through careful management finally got there.

My sole mission was to get South Africans onto that parade to help them understand what pride in service actually means. When we march past the Cenotaph we are marching down a road our forefathers took into battle – tens of thousands of South Africans paved this specific road for us in their blood. We are the carriers of that torch – we as ex-servicemen carry that privilege – that is our honour – this is our “Pride”.

Our future lies in our on-going recognition and acceptance by the veteran and the armed forces communities in the UK. Being Legion in the UK gives us the passport to do this – let’s face it the Legion is the Big Daddy here – and what we do with that passport is critical.

Keep the eye on the prize, and actively seek out your local RBL branches and clubs – make your unique mark as South African veterans within those clubs. Not everything happens in London – we must “move out” to South African veterans all over the country and provide our service to them. We need to find RBL clubs in which to regularly meet others in our area and get stuck in raising money doing Poppy Appeal activities with the branches in question.

It’s this way that we will be accepted and it’s this way that we will attract South African veterans in the UK to join us – to impart the knowledge that they too – as veterans – can participate in community activities, whereas in the past they’ve stood aside wondering if they were entitled to join in. Well now they can.

We have to create the right bedrock for these future members to join too, not all South African expatriates in the UK are interested in re-living the past, many veterans have put the whole military thing way behind them. What will attract these people is the noble cause of been part of the Legion, of been part of a fun community of like-minded fellow South Africans with a positive outlook.

We also need to continue to bring in the South Africans who have served in the British Armed Forces into our branch. These men and women are the future, they are the people who will carry this branch forward, they will give us the right credibility to stand in the place so rightfully deserved for South Africans and ultimately we need to build this foundation. They are the future “beneficiaries” of the branch who can actually benefit financially from been part of the branch and The Royal British Legion. Let’s get these people “in”.

To wrap up, we’re looking good, we’re growing, we’re expanding and our reputation in the UK is going from strength to strength – we are now a fully-fledged part of the British Veteran Community– and there are a lot of eyes on us as the newcomers to the block. We’ve withstood the challenges to emerge fully ordained, and we’ll stand proud in our mission, proud in our identity and proud in our achievement.


AJEX Parade 2015, London

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Category : Articles , Events

 

The South African Legion UK Branch , took part in this years Jewish Ex-Servicemen and Women Annual Remembrance Ceremony and Parade at the Cenotaph in Whitehall London.

The reviewing officer was Field Marshall The Lord Guthrie of Craigiebank, and the Ceremony was conducted by Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis, Rabbi (Major) Reuben Livingstone and Rabbi Harry Jacobi.


The South African Legion were made to feel welcome and we were thanked by Parade Marshall Ronald Shelly MBE for attending and showing our support.


Special thanks to Peter Gillatt and Theo Fernandes who carried the SA Legion Standards, and Andrew Bergman who helped me with the Hebrew inscription on the wreath card.

Report by Stuart Robertson.


Cenotaph Parade – London, England 2015

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More Images can be seen here.

A full contingent of South African Legion Legionnaires laid a wreath in the world renowned Cenotaph Parade held in Whitehall, London on Remembrance Sunday – 8th November 2015.

The parade has 20 000 veterans and personnel from participating public service organisations taking part in it, however the South African Legionnaires stood out in conformity as proud South African veterans.As is customary the parade begins at 11:00am with a two minute silence, the start of which is announced with an artillery salvo – heard across the city.

Queen Elizabeth II has the honour of laying the first wreath at the Cenotaph – this year she was accompanied by the King of the Netherlands. Following the Queen, serving members of Royal family lay their respective wreaths.

Once the Royal party has concluded wreath laying, members of the Cabinet, Opposition Party leaders, former Prime Ministers, the Mayor of London, other Ministers, Representatives of the Armed Forces, Faith Communities and High Commissioners of Commonwealth countries all lay wreaths.

The march past starts with the Royal British Legion’s wreath. Thereafter the numerous regiment associations, veterans associations and public service bodies march past the Cenotaph with an eyes left and present their respective wreaths.

The Legionnaires presented the South African Legion wreath – Stuart Robertson was given the honour. On the march the Legion took the salute of Prince William with an eyes right, before entering horse guards to conclude the march and dismiss.

The wreath for the Royal British Legion South African branch was handed over by the branch’s youth members in the civilian columns.

Post parade refreshments and wrap up was held at the Kings Head in Shepard’s Lane. Peter Dickens – the branch Chairman – thanked all the Legionnaires and branch members – over 30 members where on parade, exceeding last years numbers and this is indicative of the highly positive culture in he branch which is growing from strength to strength.

Notable thanks were given to Peter Gillatt, Theo Fernandes, Karen Dickens, Stuart Robertson, Russell Mattushek, Paul Gladwin, Andrew Bergman, Cameron Kinnear, Cary Hendricks and Simon Mcllwaine for the success of the parades in London and Glasgow and significant contributions to the branch over the year.

The social was concluded with the anointment of the Branch’s Ceremonial Officer’s swagger stick – kindly donated by Russell Mattushek.


First SAAF Buccaneer – RNAS Lossiemouth

 

This year marks the 50th anniversary of this historic flight – 25 May 1965 history was made when Cmdt Bob Rogers and Maj John Murphy lifted off at Holme-On-Spalding-Moor with Buccaneer S MK50 tail number 413 at 16h50 for the flight of the first SAAF Buccaneer to be delivered at the re-formed 24 Sqn at RNAS Lossiemouth.

The flight time was 50 minutes and they landed at Lossiemouth at 17h40 to the delight of all the flight and ground crew members who were all very proud to receive their first aircraft.

Image and caption courtesy of Johan Conradie


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